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PROJECT IRON FIST

Project lron Fist PROPOSAL FOR THE PROVISION OF SECURITY TRAINING, SECURITY INTERVENTION and OILFIELD PROTECTION SUPPORT SERVICES to GOVERNMENT OF SOUTH SUDAN Table of Contents INTRODUCHON ?2 BACKGROUND ..2 Safety and Security in South Sudan .. 2 Peacetalks ..3 Sanc?ons ..3 Safety and Security in South Sudan Oil Fields .. 4 Oil Production in Sudan and South Sudan; thousand barrels per day statistics .. 4 Problem Definition (Current Threat Analysis) .. 5 Major clashes and areas of control, Unity State: October 2014 .. 5 Recent reported incidents of violence in South Sudan-Sept to Oct 2014 .. 6 Perceived Rebel Course of Action (Worst and most likely Course of Action) .. 6 Proposed Solution .. 7 OPFRequuements ?7 OPF Characteristics .. 8 Counterinsurgency Concept of Operations .. 9 The Concept of oilfield installation protection .. 9 Zone 1 Protection .. 10 Zone 2 Protection .. 11 Zone 3 Protection .. 11 Zone 4 Protection .. 12 Development of Project Iron Fist Operational COIN Concept .. 12 Designing the OPF Organization .. 12 Foreign Rapid Deployment Combat Team (FRDT) Organization Structure .. 13 SPLA 1st Special Operations Battalion Organization Structure .. 13 SPLA 2nd Special Operations Battalion Organization Structure .. 14 SPLA 3rd Special Operations Battalion Organization Structure .. 14 Execution of Project Iron Fist COIN Concept of Operations .. 15 Stage 1: Preparation, mobilization procurement of main equipment and logistics support .. 15 Stage 2: Operational deployment of the FRDT .. 16 1 Page

Project Iron Fist Stage 3: Train and equip 3 Special Operations Battalions .. 16 Stage 4: Integration deployment of 3 with the FRDT .. 16 Stage 5: Management and control of stabilized areas .. 17 Project iron Fist Protected Timeline .. 18 Stage 1 ..18 Stage 2 .. 18 Stage 3 .. 19 Stage 4 .. 19 Stage 5 .. 20 Project Iron Fist Budgetary Costing .. 20 Terms and Conditions .. 21 Pawnent ..21 End User Certificate (EUC) .. 21 CONCLUSION .. 21 Annex A: Profile of Security Services Provider (SSP) .. 22 Annex B: Summary of Aircraft Requirement .. 24 Annex C: Summary of Aircraft Ordnance Requirement .. 25 Annex D: Summary of Ground Forces Weapons Requirement .. 29 Annex E: Summary of Ground Forces Weapons and Ammunition .. 30 Annex F: Summary of Vehicles Requirement .. 31 Annex G: Summary of Communications Equipment Requirement .. 34 Annex H: Summary of Special Equipment Requirement .. 37 INTRODUCTION The Foreign Security Services Provider was invited by the Client to design a proposal for the provision of oilfield security training, security intervention and protection support services to the Government of South Sudan. BACKGROUND Safety and Security in South Sudan The conflict erupted in December 2013, when an intensifying power struggle between President Salva Kiir and former vice-president Riek Machar boiled over into ?ghting within the Sudan People?s Liberation Army (SPLA) in the capital, Juba. 2 Page

Project Iron Fist Violence quickly engulfed much ofthe north and east of the country, pitting troops loyal to Kiir against rebel units and militias aligned with Machar. Thousands of civilians are believed to have died, many ofthem targeted for their ethnicity. President Salva Kiir is an ethnic Dinka, and Riek Machar an ethnic Nuer. According to the UN, the violence has displaced 1.3 million people within the country, including about 100,000 sheltering in often squalid conditions in UN bases. With agriculture disrupted, livelihoods lost and trade patterns wrecked, nearly four million face serious food insecurity. Another 450,000 have fled to neighbouring Sudan, Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda. Peace talks The aforementioned countries, as part of the IGAD regional grouping, have tried to broker an agreement between the warring parties. Seeking to address root causes of the conflict, IGAD as well as foreign donors also have pressed the two sides to sign up for far-reaching reforms as well as a power-sharing deal in a transitional government. The mediators have threatened "punitive" action against spoilers, but the feuding South Sudanese factions appear far from reaching agreement. Machar last month refused to sign a detailed protocol mapping a way out of the conflict, even though it offered to create the position of prime minister for an opposition nominee. The protocol also included commitments designed to de-centralize power, 'rein in corruption and foster reconciliation. The talks have continued but suffered another blow during the second week of October?14, when government spokesman Michael Makuei Lueth demanded the removal of the Ethiopian chief mediator, accusing him of pursuing "regime change? at the behest of the USA, the UK and Norway. He reportedly also demanded that the process relocate to Kenya. Protagonists have warned of all-out war ifthe talks founder, fanning concern that while the politicians declare their commitment to making peace, commanders on both sides are preparing new military campaigns. Sanctions The US and European Union have imposed sanctions on a handful of commanders from both sides. The US is definitely considering punitive measures on both sides in an effort to stop the war, but there are doubts that the international community, including regional powers jockeying for political and economic influence, will bring significant pressure to bear. IGAD has yet to follow through with its own threat of sanctions, even after the warring sides failed to meet a series of deadlines. has most recently urged the parties to reach an agreement by mid-October. 3 Page

Project Iron Fist Safety and Security in South Sudan Oil Fields A dispute over political power, not oil, triggered clashes in Juba on 15 Dec 2013. But the conflict quickly turned into a ?ght over South Sudan?s strategic oil-rich regions when on 26 Dec 2014, former SPLA 4th Division Commander General James Koang crossed the floor with all troops and equipment under command to occupy Bentiu, in oil rich Unity State, and join the Machar rebellion. The capitals of two richest oil producing areas, Bentiu (Unity) and Malakal (Upper Nile), have changed hands more than once during the past 12 months. Battles also have been fought in Bor, the capital of a region with untapped oil reserves that are potentially lucrative. Oil output has dropped more than 40 percent since the conflict began, say, as rebels have seized vital oil-producing regions. China, which has invested billions in South Sudan?s oil infrastructure, has been forced to shut down operations in Bentiu areas and evacuate scores of Chinese oil workers. Before the crisis, South Sudan was producing about 220,000 to 240,000 barrels of oil per day, with roughly two-thirds heading to China. According to Bloomerg.com current oil production is at 160,000 barrels per day produced mainly from Paloich and Adar Oilfields in Upper Nile State. This is the only region that is yet unscathed by war and remains the economic life buoy of the country. Oil Production in Sudan and South Sudan; thousand barrels per day statistics Note! 2014 statistics is January ?June Oil productionm Sudan and South Sudan Ibo-n" hands you an we - $006." tSa-u?lv than 500 am Wanna?. maumm.m Wu mm A Imu?ovowm mummww 300 madam200.6 2004 2007 mm 21:99 2010 2011 2014? 2'0 90 (319 from? thug: mm Unmumdmem Sudan sum-ha w: u; 400 Aware!) MM revamp-pr. 350 1' .500 [?50 200 we '00 9426 NAM-hor(?may ?90".me Source: US Energy information Administration 4 Page

Project Iron Fist South Sudan depends on oil for 98% of its revenue, and the prolonged conflict has already impacted heavily of the country?s economy and if not contained soon, could bankrupt the country and bring more chaos to the world?s youngest state. Problem Definition (Current Threat Analysis) Rebels lead by Riek Machar, internality destabilise oil production areas in the Unity State of South Sudan with the aim to stop oil production altogether to cripple the economy and slow down development to take over the South Sudanese Government lead by President Salva Kiir. A month ago, on 30 Oct 2014 heavy clashes occurred between the SPLA and a large force of more than 10,000 armed rebels for control over Bentiu. After three days of ?ghting and heavy casualties on both sides the SPLA managed to retake the town and push the rebels back across the Bar El Ghazal River towards the Sudanese border. Major clashes and areas of control, Unity State: October 2014 Source: 5 Page

Project Iron Fist Recent reported incidents of violence in South Sudan-Sept to Oct 2014 -MN ?Maw? Mm ?ag-.111; - 1.2? a mu? mamawmu ?mm It!" in? Dan 9..er A Wu: umm catatonia YGWW VOW NW . wm?m ummui 9 3mm? swam: mum mum P??yi?_aw mun I $344,100.000 i} a A Source Perceived Rebel Course of Action (Worst and most likely Course of Action) The past few months also saw increased rebel activity west of the White Nile River in the Upper Nile State which suggests dissidents are planning a major offensive against the Paloich and Adar Oil?elds during the dry season when good ground mobility is possible, before the coming of the next wet season around June 2015. Machar will continue to lobby for external support in the region (Uganda, Kenya and Ethiopia) and further afield as far as South Africa, to promote his cause as a credible and suitable political alternative for South Sudan. Machar?s rebels will continue however with recruitment and training of recruits and stockpiling of weapons, ammunition and logistics in the Nuba Mountains area of Sudan (traditional Nuer stronghold), with direct support from the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF). The rebels will maintain their two pronged strategy to engage SPLA forces in Nuer stronghold areas around Bentiu to retake the Unity (GNPOC) oilfields and bind the SPLA forces in a stalemate position around Malakal. Once these objectives are achieved the rebels will probably launch a major offensive from Sudan territory via Renk in the north and 6 Page

Project Iron Fist Kaka from the west approach routes, to engage and target the current production Paloich- and Adar (Dar Petroleum) oilfields. lfthey are successful in disrupting oil production in this region, South Sudan?s already fragile economy will come to a grinding halt. Proposed Solution In order for sustained stability in the oil production regions of South Sudan the need for a credible Oilfie/ds Protection Force (OPF) exists to counter, deter and stand off the Rebel?s worst and most likely Course of Action. The OPF should adopt a concept of operations suitable to counter rebel insurgency, guerilla and destabilizing actions as was evident during the past 12 months of the rebellion. OPF Requirements The OPF should be able to: - Dominate the areas of Influence (mobility is crucial land, air water) Act as a credible deterrent 0 Act defensively (protect) areas and to act offensively to interdict, search and destroy deliberate objectives, pockets of resistance and react to any possible threats Collect, analyze and disseminate real time information to act pro-actively to maintain and sustain operations . Be supported by air assets for intelligence collection, observation, command and control, rapid reaction and mobility Have fixed wing aircraft (planes and transporters) as well as helicopters (attack and transport) are required to provide operational and tactical mobility and close air support 0 Have sound command and control. Co-operation with RSS and SPLA Forces 0 Deploy and operate in harsh terrain and extreme climatic conditions in the areas as depicted in the diagrams here below: I ?at:er a. Mm $944095 WW amt?; Sit-um hm no 7 Page

Project lron Fist OPF Characteristics The OPF should be well organized, equipped, trained and deployed to counter and deter the threat of Machar?s rebels to physically overrun and occupy the economic heartland of South Sudan, the Bentui (GNPOC) Paloich and Adar (Dar Petroleum) oilfields. The OPF should have highly air mobile and balanced capabilities that could be deployed in various offensive and support roles during the execution of counterinsurgency operations missions. The air organization should include: Mi-24/25/35 Attack helicopters armed with machine guns, unguided rockets, anti-tank guided missiles and aerial bombs to deploy offensively against rebels and provide close air support to ground troops Mi-8/17/171 Multirole helicopters fitted with stub wings to accommodate machine guns and unguided rockets. The helicopters should provide tactical air mobility to deploy and support combat troops to engage rebels by means of deliberate air landed operations, raids and other specialized operations Heavy lift air cargo transport aircraft (charter), for rapid deployment and repositioning of troops and equipment Light/medium air cargo transport aircraft for tactical deployment oftroops and logistics supplies. Capability should include airdrop roller and rail systems for cargo parachute dropping of logistics AB-412 Multirole helicopters for tactical transport, medevacand resupply in combat areas of operation Ayres Thrush /Air Tractor multirole fixed wing aircraft equipped/fitted with day/night sensor ball, for tactical and strategic aerial intelligence collection, surveillance and reconnaissance Cessna Caravan multirole fixed wing passenger aircraft equipped/fitted with a ISR day/night sensor ball for tactical and strategic aerial intelligence collection, surveillance and reconnaissance, as well as providing an airborne command and control post from where OPF offensive and defensive actions could be managed Air logistics and technical elements to support, sustain and maintain medium to high frequency air operations The OPF should have highly mobile forces with a balanced mix of motorized and mechanized units, that could be deployed in armed armoured personnel carriers (fighting vehicles) and troop carriers to engage rebels during counter insurgency offensive and defensive operations. The motorized and mechanized units should be equipped with a full array of standard conventional personal equipment, platoon, company and battalion support weapons including personal assault rifles, light and heavy machine guns, light anti-tank weapons, grenade launchers, light and medium mortars as well as sniper rifles. All OPF units sub units should be equipped with excellent strategic, operational and tactical means of communications including HF, FM radios and satellite telephones. The communication system should be integrated between all units and managed from joint 8 Page

Project Iron Fist operations center, from where centralized/decentralized operational command and control of operations should be managed. The OPF should have a balanced, guaranteed logistics support structure to support medium to high frequency of counterinsurgency operations in the theatre of operations. The support elements should include obstacle crossing-, technicaI-, logistics procurement, delivery and supply-, medical-, personnel finance administration-, base support and security to the total force. Counterinsurgency Concept of Operations The OPF will adopt a Counterinsurgency Concept of Operations to counter the operational and tactical doctrine that has been displayed by Machar?s rebel forces over the past year. The concept is based on the Counterinsurgency principles of operation (COIN) by John McCuen: The Art of Counter Insurgency War (1966), in which comprehensive civilian and military efforts are needed to simultaneously defeat and contain insurgency and address its root causes. The COIN concept provides for executing area stabilising operations in key selected areas, driven by sound Intelligence to secure and safeguard oil producing and support installations by means of static and mobile protection capabilities. The pillars of the COIN concept is depicted in the diagram here below: - The Concept of oilfield installation protection Derived from the COIN concept the OPF will deploy a four tier defence protection approach supplemented by offensive pre-emptive strikes, raids and actions against rebel bases, groupings, strongholds, logistics installations and command control installations. 9 Page

Project Iron Fist Self-explanatory concentric ring approach depicting the four tier defence protection approach is depicted in the following diagram: Concentric Ring Approach Four Tier Defence Protection Zone 1: Inner Perimeter Zone 2: Zone of Direct Influence - Protection of direct ea from where direct facility. Direct fen access control 1/ Zone 4: Area of nfluence 7 - Area fro whereulndirect Weapons Area Wh dISSIdents Self-explanatory defensive zones 1-4, ranging from 1-40 km around key oil installations, are depicted in the diagrams here below: Zone 1 Protection Concentric Ring Approach Four Tier Defence Protection Perimeter Fencing Access and Egress control Close circuit CCTV Health, Security, Safety, Environment Fire Foot Vehicle patrols Static Guarding Prepared Defensive positions Rapid Response Teams Zone 1: inner Perimeter - Protection of direct facility. Direct fence with access control I I

Project Iron Fist Zone 2 Protection Concentric Ring Approach Four Tier Defence/ Protection Zone 2: Zone of Direct Influence 3? Area from where direct weapons can ., - Area Patrols by vehicles - Local Population Intel - Intel Network 0 Helicopter patrols - Fixed Wing Patrols lntel Network - ID possible Mortar Rocket launching areas. 0 Register as Mortar Targets in Fire plan - 30 Access Routes Zone 3 Protection Concentric Ring Approach Four Tier Defence Protection Zone 3: Area of Tactical Importance '0 Area from where indirect Weapons can cause damage (Up to 7 km) - Area Patrols by vehicles 0 Local Population Intel - Intel Network UAV's Helicopter patrols Fixed Wing Patrols intel Network ID possible Mortar Rocket launching areas. Register as Mortar Targets in Fire plan ID Access Routes 11 Page

Project Iron Fist Zone 4 Protection Concentric Ring Approach Four Tier Defence/ Protection Zone 4: Area of Influence ?0 Area from where dissidents saboteurs can stage attacks during 1 night (up to 40 km Area Patrols by vehicles Local Population intei Intei Network UAV's Helicopter patrols Fixed Wing Patrols Intel Network ID Access routes ID stopper positions Riverine Operations Development of Project Iron Fist Operational COIN Concept The operational concept will be developed in five distinct stages as follows: Stage 1: Preparation, mobilization procurement of main equipment and logistics support Stage 2: Operational deployment of a Foreign Rapidly Deployed and Intervention Combat Team (FRDT) Stage 3: Train and equip 3 Special Operations Battalions Stage 4: Integration deployment of 3 with the RFDT Stage 5: Management and control of stabilized areas Designing the OPF Organization The proposed OPF would consist of a professional Foreign Rapid Deployment Combat Team (FRDT) consisting of 341 foreign nationals, including 81 training instructors mentors), and SPLA 1S Special Operations Battalion (total 400 personnel) SPLA 2n Special Operations Battalion (total 400 personnel) SPLA 3r Special Operations Battalion (total 400 personnel) Total Force: 1541 personnel 12 Page

Project Iron Fist Foreign Rapid Deployment Combat Team (FRDT) Organization Structure 13 Page

Project Iron Fist SPLA 2nd Special Operations Battalion Organization Structure

Project lron Fist Execution of Project Iron Fist COIN Concept of Operations Stage 1: Preparation, mobilization procurement of main equipment and logistics support Contracting Obtain EUC to place orders for capital assets (aircraft, weapons, ammunition and other controlled equipment) 60% Upfront payment to procure, order, capital assets: Aircraft Main weapons Ammunition Communications equipment Special equipment Armoured vehicles Troop carriers 0 Base camps and support equipment Organization, recruitment, vetting, phased mobilization and placement of foreign workforce (PMO, JOC, communications centre, logistics support, life support, etc.) in allocated base Ground works preparation for 4 450 man base camp areas and secure lay down areas for inbound equipment and logistics . Receipt of base camp equipment in host country and transport equipment to selected base camp areas Build 4 450 man base camps and establish infrastructure support to import all the capital assets required for the project at selected Deploy 81 foreign trainer mentors to Mapel Training Centre to commence preparation for the training of 3 Sea and transport operation to deliver to host country: 0 Aircraft Main weapons Ammunition Communications equipment Special equipment Armoured vehicles 0 Troop carriers Certification of aircraft in host country Integration of weapons systems, testing and commissioning Repositioning and transportation of all the above to selected Forward Operating Base (FOB) Commissioning of 4 base camps Develop physical and active base defence systems 0000000 00000 15 Page

Project Iron Fist Stage 2: Operational deployment of the FRDT Activate the Joint Operations Centre (JOC) forjoint planning of operations in conjunction with SPLA Chief of Staff Operations Conduct airborne survey operations to gather /col ect Intel about rebel deployments, bases and movements Analysis and dissemination of collected intelligence data Planning and execution of offensive ground and air actions (deliberate attacks, raids, ambushes, etc.) against key rebel objectives deployments strongholds logistics support bases and installations, etc.) Conduct survey of oil field installations to design protection plan Continuous medium to high intensity rapid intervention ground and air actions against selected rebel deployments, targets and objectives. Typical tasks will include: 0 Air Patrols 0 Air to ground stand-off attacks 0 Area Patrols (long range deployment) 0 Search destroy missions 0 Observation surveillance Stage 3: Train and equip 3 Special Operations Battalions Foreign trainer mentor group organize and structure the 2nd and each with 3 Combat/Rifle Companies and 1 Support Company Foreign trainer/ mentor group equip and train the 3 by running 3 concurrent parallel 8 week courses for the accelerated training of each of the 3 at Mapel, covering the following minimum subjects: 0 3 Battalion (Planning, execution and support of motorized and mechanized COIN operations) 0 3 Rifle Companies (motorized-and mechanized infantry subjects) I Platoon weapons proficiency and musketry I Minor tactics I Mobile operations I Vehicle reconnaissance I Obstacle crossing (rivers) I Communications equipment I Company support tactics 1 Support Company in all aspects of COIN including: I Mortars (60mm 82mm) I HMG (12.7mm) I A65 17 AGL (30mm) 0 Organize, structure and equip each SOB to ultimately execute offensive mobile operations against rebels in Unity, Jonglei and Upper Nile States Stage 4: Integration deployment of 3 with the FRDT Force marrying up and integration between FRDT in a joint field exercise including: 0 Immediate action drills for security 0 Area Patrols 16 a

Project Iron Fist Air mobile deployment Vehicle movement and protection Helicopter drills Fire-force operations Sweep operations Offensive actions (deliberate attacks, raids and ambushes) Defensive actions Collection of geographic and demographic info 0 Show of force Joint planning of operations with 2nd 3rd operations planning staff Conduct airborne survey operations to gather /co ect Intel about Rebel deployments, bases and movements Analysis and dissemination of collected intelligence data Planning and execution of offensive ground and air actions (deliberate attacks, raids, ambushes, etc.) against key Rebel objectives deployments strongholds logistics support bases and installations, etc.) Oilfield security deployments to protect key installations to enable oilfield engineers and technicians to repair unserviceable damage pipes, taps, valves, etc. to restore the pumping and flow of oil from key wells and installations Continuous joint COIN operations to enhance security of key oil field installations Oilfield Police support actions Stage 5: Management and control of stabilized areas Continued intelligence operations Continued area domination (ground and air patrols) Law enforcement support by arresting dissidents and handing them over to SS Police for prosecution Disrupting rebel logistics support and communications lines Establishment of additional Facilitation of further assistance, humanitarian support and economic recovery (development and growth) of greater north eastern South Sudan, Job creation Training, education basic skills development programs Infrastructure rehabilitation development Restore and establish essential services (water sanitation, roads, education, health, judicial, etc.) Maintenance of public law and order Agricultural programs 17 Page

Project Iron Fist Project iron Fist Protected Timeline Stage 1 Iron Fist Timeline mobilization of main and Contracting Obtain EUC to place orders for capital assets (aircraft, weapons, ammunition and other controlled 60% Upfront payment to procure, order, import and deliver capital assets to identi?ed FOB Aircraft Main weapons Ammunition Communications Armoured vehicles carriers Base and 0 13 recruitment, vetting, phased mobilization and placement of foreign workforce works preparation 4 450 man base camp areas and secure lay down areas for 1.4 Receipt of base camp equipment in host country and transport equipment to selected base 15 areas Build 4 450 man base camps and establish infrastructure support to import all the capital 1.6 uired for the at selected Deploy 31 foreign trainer mentors to Mapel Training Centre to commence preparation for 1.7 of 3 1.8 and transport operation to deliver to host 1.8.1 Aircraft Main 1.8.3 Ammunition 1.8.4 Communications 1.8.5 0 1.8.6 Armoured vehicles 1.3.7 carriers 1.9 Certi?cation of aircraft in host 1.10 Integration of weapons systems, testing and commissioning 1?11 Repositioning and transportation of all the above to selected Fonivard Operating Base (FOB) 112 OH base cam 1.13 and active base defence Stage 2 Iron Fist Timeline of the FRDT the Joint Operations Centre (JOC) for joint planning of operations in conjunction SPLA Chief of Staff airborne survey operations to gather l[collect Intel about rebel deployments, bases and movements and dissemination of collected data Planning and execution of offensive ground and air actions (deliberate attacks, raids, etc.) against key rebel objectives deployments strongholds] logistics support bases and etc. of oil field installations to medium to high intensity rapid intervention ground and air actions against rebel and tasks will include: Air Patrols Air to stand-off attacks 0 Area Patrols 0 Search missions 0 Observation [Surveillance 18 Page

Project iron Fist Stage 3 Iron Fist Timeline rain and 3x Battalions Foreign trainer mentor group organize and structure the 2"d and 3MSOB, eadi with 3 and 1 3: Foreign trainer mentor group equip and train the 3 by running 3 concurrent parallel 8 week courses for the accelerated training of each of the 3 at Mapel, 3.2 the minimum 3x Battalion (Planning, execution and support of motorized and mechanized COIN 3.3 3.4 3x Rifle (motorized-and mechanized 3.4.1 Platoon wea and 3.4.2 Minor tactics 3.4.3 Mobile 3.4.4 Vehicle reconnaissance 3.4.5 Obstacle 3.4.6 Communications 3.4.7 support tactics 3.5 lit in all of COIN 3.5.1 Mortars (60mm 82mm) 3.5.2 HMG 12. 3.53 A65 1? AGL Organize, structure and equip each $08 to ultimately execute offensive mobile operations 3.5 rebels in and Nile States Stage 4 Iron Fist Timeline 4 of 3 with the FRDT 4.1 Force and between FRDT in a ?eld exercise 4.1.1 Immediate action drills for 4.1.2 Area Patrols 4.1.3 Air mobile 4.1.4 Vehicle movement and 4.1.5 drills 4.1.6 Fire-force 4.1.7 4.1.8 Offensive actions attacks, raids and 4.1.9 Defensive actions 4.1.10 Collection of and info 4.1.11 Show of force 4.2 of with 1? 2"d 3" 503?s staff airborne survey operations to gather [collect lntel about Rebel deployments, bases 4.3 movements 4.4 and dissemination of collected data Planning and execution of offensive ground and air actions (deliberate attacks, raids, etc.) against key Rebel objectives deployments strongholds logistics Support bases and etc. Oilfield security deployments to protect key installations to enable oilfield engineers and n5 to repair unserviceable/ damage pipes, taps, valves, etc. to restore the pumping flow of oil from wells and installations COIN operations to enhance of oilfield installations Police actions 19 Page

Project Iron Fist Stage 5 5 Mana Iron Fist Timeline and control of stabilized areas 5.1 Continued 5.2 Continued area domination nd and air patrols) Law enforcement support by arresting dissidents and handing them over to SS Police for 5.3 5.4 rebel support and communications lines 5.5 Establishment of additional FOB's Facilitation of further assistance, humanitarian support and economic recovery 5.6 5.7 and of north eastern South education basic skills 5.8 Infrastructure rehabilitation development Restore and establish essential services (water sanitation, roads, education, health, 5.9 5.10 Maintenance of 5.11 law and order with Project Iron Fist Budgetary Costing Budget item Description Total USD Expat Salaries 341 365 days LN Salaries 1200 365 days Rations Expats 341 365 days LN Rations 1200 365 days Turn Key Base Camps; 4 385 man Camps Vehicles 236 (Armoured APC, Troop Carriers, C, Log Support, Construction Tech Support Diesel Fuel, Oil, Lubricants Vehicle Spares, Support 8: Maintenance Camping Opex and Life Support Aircraft 15 including spares, technical support and ordnance Aviation Fuel Airdrop Equipment Medical Facility (Clinic Trauma Post) Medicine Ground Forcers Air Weapons Ammunition $61 380 000.00 $7 200 000.00 $3 733 950.00 $5 256 000.00 $10 841 000.00 $37 913 000.00 57 336 800.00 $4 691 300.00 $5 205 900.00 $62 800 000.00 $10 522 331.00 $1 350 000.00 $3 647 000.00 $66,508,420.00 20 Page

15 16 17 18 19 Project iron Fist Budget Item Description Total USD Air Weapons Ammunition $13 560 000.00 Expat Life, Accident, Disability and Medical Insurance $3 500 000.00 Communication Equipment $2 509 000.00 Combat Equipment, Uniforms and PPE 1541 personnel $2 509 000.00 IL-76 Cargo Transport Aircraft Charter (150 block hours) $3 000 000.00 Grand Total $299,904,701.00 Terms and Conditions Payment 60% Advance Payment to start up project and procure capital assets 20% Milestone Payment after 90 days 20% Final Payment after 180 days End User Certificate (EUC) Legal EUC not liable to US, UN, EU or AU sanction to procure Aircraft, Arms Ammunition and special equipment from Government Suppliers CONCLUSIO The Project Iron Fist Proposal offers a Foreign Security Services solution for countering, deterring and neutralizing the rebel threat to the Government of South Sudan, over a minimum period of 12 months. For and on behalf of SECURITY SERVICES PROVIDER (SSP) 21 Page

Project Iron Fist Annex A: Profile of Security Services Provider (SSP) SSP is a foreign private security contractor, with more than 20 years of frontline experience in providing foreign military assistance related support to Client Governments. SSP offers a full range of comprehensive services tailored to individual client?s total satisfaction. The policy and strategic direction of the security organization is aimed to support the Client Government in ensuring Internal security stability and normality - Prosperity Economic growth - Total independence The policy of total client-confidence is rigidly adhered to at all times. SSP mission To provide a professional and confidential service to all existing and potential clients - To ensure that all contracts have the aim of ensuring stability within the client?s area of interest To create as many "spin-offs? as possible on behalf ofthe client, which may positively impact on the client?s economic or social structures 0 To, in a volatile political climate, ensure that all projects are approached cost effectively, with an a-political stance - Service Offerings SSP realises that there can be no stability without peace. Peace, being the foundation of prosperity, can only be achieved through thorough planning and a desire to strive for which is best. This too is the attitude with which SSP approaches its Clients and Projects. As such the following services are offered: Foreign Military Assistance. SSP directs its main thrust towards certain specialist fields in the private military and security markets. These fields include the following: 0 The training of personnel 0 The rendering of military and/or security advice to clients 0 Providing equipment advice 0 Identifying, sourcing and procuring equipment on behalf of clients 9 Professional assistance in special military procurement programs 0 Sale of special procurement items of both NATO and East Bloc specification, to Governments not sanctioned Training_& Advisory Services. SSP has been tasked by numerous Client Governments to provide training in the fields of military-, para-military- and security disciplines, some of which are listed here below: Specialised intelligence 0 Close protection 22 Page

CONCLUSION Project Iron Fist Assistance with re-organisation and re-structuring programs Land warfare programs (conventional, semi-conventional and low intensity conflicts) Air warfare programs Electronic warfare and surveillance programs Military logistics support Specialist divers (saturation bell diving) Train the trainer and mentoring process is followed for all training courses Advice, guidance and support re special procurement requirements of military and security equipment SSP is a dynamic, professional organisation that can be relied upon to give its very best at all times. Since its inception the organisation has proved itself in the specialist security and foreign military market. 23 Page

Project Iron Fist Annex B: Summary of Aircraft Requirement Description Quantity Ayms Thrush lAir Tractor Aircraft ?tted with Ball md underwing had points for external hardware Antonov AN-26 Light Cargo Aircraft ?tted with Air Drop Rail I Roller system and overhead cable Augusta Bell 412 NMlirole Helicopter equipped with airbome medevac md life support equipment Cessna Caravan ?tted with FUR Bail 24 Page

Project Iron Fist Annex C: Summary of Aircraft Ordnance Requirement ?9 {a 1'1. Jul: {.0th Imusirt ?Hanna 4 4, 3) 2 hum!? miqu ?ui?t kg a I hman mhh-s ."ao kx ?ll-1min, with? 5.3; . (1) .: 1mm; 4. :1 "i ru'kmu ??uh (nth-1s rm. 2 ,mn Km. Yum-lg", unsurzn - . usl(9?3 4 FAT ?Illa gmuxk- hum hm . 4? pi.? 2 (HA arm huh manhunguidul misul? 'Au?u" W120 v) 4 mrk?s ?lgia? and 8 .mlMank [mkied ?Auh? ?bugwu bombs bombs bombs M: Hf f] Muituuiw Hibilirn._mlwr 25 Page

Project Iron Fist Description Image Quantity BV 20 5-8 Rocket Pods for Mi-24 Attack Helicopter 16 80mm S-8KO HEAT Unguided Rockets 1,000 80mm FAE Unguided Rockets with fuse 500 80mm Tandem HEAT Unguided Rockets with 500 fuse Shturm ATGM Launch Rails 8 shturm- 9k113 SACLOS HEAT Missile 50 Belted Cartridge AM 23; 23mm 115mm HE 50,000 Beited Cartridge AM 23;23mm 115mm HE Frag 25?000 Belted Cartridge AM 23;23mm 115mm 25900 Unguided Rocket Pod 16 57mm 5?5 Unguided Rockets HE with fuse 1,000 57mm 56 Unguided Rockets HE Frag with fuse 500 26 Page

Project iron Fist Bomb FAB HE Frag for Ml-24 Helicopters 100 Bomb FAB 250kg HE Frag for Ml-24 Helicopters 200 Bomb FAB 100kg HE Frag for Ml-24 Helicopters 300 7.62mm PK Machine Gun Pod 8 Belted Cartridge 7.62 54 Ball 500,000 Belted Cartridge 7.62 54 Tracer 100,000 Belted Cartridge 7.62 54 100,000 Tabled Summary of Air Ordnance Requirements Ser No 1 2 10 11 Item Description BV 20 5?8 Rocket Pods for Ml-24 Attack Helicopter 80mm S-8KO HEAT Unguided Rockets 80mm S-6DM FAE Unguided Rockets with fuse 80mm S-8T Tandem HEAT Unguided Rockets with fuse Shturm ATGM Launch Rails Shturm- 9k113 SACLOS HEAT Missile Belted Cartridge AM 23; 23mm 115mm HE Belted Cartridge AM 23;23mm 115mm HE Frag Belted Cartridge AM 23;23mm 115mm API 5-5 Unguided Rocket Pod 57mm S-5 Unguided Rockets HE with fuse Quantity 8 1,000 500 500 8 50 50,000 25,000 25,000 16 1000 27 Page

Project iron Fist 57mm S-S Unguided Rockets HE Frag with fuse 7.62mm PK Machine Gun Pod for Mi-8/17Helicopter Belted Cartridge 7.62 54 Ball Belted Cartridge 7.62 54 Tracer Belted Cartridge 7.62 54 API Bomb FAB 500kg HE Frag for MI-24 Helicopters Bomb FAB 250kg HE Frag for Ml-24 Helicopters Bomb FAB 100kg HE Frag for Ml-24 Helicopters 500 8 500,000 100,000 100,000 100 200 300 28 Page

Project Iron Fist Annex D: Summary of Ground Forces Weapons Requirement AKM 7.52 39mm PKM LMG 7.62 54R 105 12.7mm HMG 52 Saiga 12 KSK VEPR Fully Automatic Shotgun 20 Magazine each) 81 (540) 40mm Arcus MGL 105 40mm RPG7 ATRL 105 82mm Mortar 18 M4 60mm Commando Mortar 12 Lapua Long Range .338 Sniper Rifle 10 Truvelo .308 Sniper Rifle 10 Optix Optical Day sight 81mm Mortar 29 Page

Annex E: Summary of Ground Forces Weapons and Ammunition Project Iron Fist 1 12.7mm MG (Vehicle Mounted) 52 2 Plamya 30mm A65 17 AGL Incl Drum Magazine and 30 round Feeding Belt 35 3 Plamya 30mm A63 17, Drum Magazine with 30 round Feeding Belt 300 4 M4 60mm Commando Mortar 12 5 60mm Long Range Mortar 8 6 Arsenal 7.62mm AR M1 Assault Rifle 1541 7 Arsenal 7.62 mm PKM LMG 105 8 Arsenal 12.7mm HMG with tripod 52 9 40mm ATGL 105 10 SVD Dragunov 7.62mm Sniper Rifle/ .338 Lapua 10 11 Truvelo 7.62mm Sniper Ri?e 10 12 Milkor 40mm 6 Shot Multiple Grenade Launcher 105 13 Round 12.7mm 108mm Ball 5,000,000 14 Round 12.7mm 108mm Tracer 2,000,000 15 Round 12.7mm 108mm 2,000,000 16 Grenade 30 298 HE V06 for 30mm 40mm for Milkor MGL 100,000 17 Bomb 81mm Mortar HE 3,000 18 Bomb 81mm Mortar Smoke 500 19 Bomb 60 mm Mortar HE 3,000 20 Bomb 60mm Mortar Smoke 500 21 Bomb 60mm Mortar HE Long Range 1,000 22 Bomb 60mm Mortar Smoke Long Range 200 23 Bomb 60mm Mortar HE Thermo baric 500 24 Cartridge 7.62 39mm Ball 10,000,000 25 Cartridge 7.62 39mm Tracer 3,000,000 26 Cartridge 7.62 54R Ball 10,000,000 27 Cartridge 7.62 54R Tracer 3,000,000 28 Cartridge 7.62 54R HEI 1,000,000 29 Cartridge 7.62 51mm Ball Sniper NATO standard 50,000 30 Cartridge 7.62 54R Ball Sniper 50,000 31 Grenade 40 53mm HE for MGL 2,000 32 Grenade Hand No 83 Smoke (Red, Green, Blue, Yellow, Orange) 1,000 33 Grenade Hand No 83 Smoke White 500 34 Grenade Hand Two Star Instant Light 500 35 Solas 1000? Parachute Flare Red, Green, Blue, White 500 36 Solas 1000' Parachute Flare Illumination 300 37 Solas 1000? Parachute Flare Green Red Star 500 30 Page

Project Iron Fist Annex F: Summary of Vehicles Requirement Toyota Landcruiser 79 Pick-up 4 4 Diesel 40 units Toyota Landcruiser 79 Pick?up 4 4 Diesel Command Fitted with Radio Brackets 20 units Toyota Landcruiser 79 Pick?up 4 4 Diesel Ambulance 5 units REVA MK Ill MPV/lFV/l'roop Carrier 4 4 Diesel 100 units Kamaz 43118 10 ton 6 6 Troop Carrier with Canopy and Seating Benches for 30 troops 40 units Kamaz 6568 20 ton 8 8 Log Truck with lOton crane 5 units Kamaz 43118 10 ton 6 6 Recovery Truck 3 units Kamaz 43118 20 ton 6 6 20,000l Water Browser Truck 2 Kamaz 43118 11 ton 6 6 11,000! Jet A?l Browser Truck 2 31 Page

Project Iron Fist Kamaz 43118 11 ton 6 6 11,000l Diesel Browser Truck 3 units Kamaz 43118 10 ton 6 6 Diesel Mobile Workshop Truck 2 units Kamaz 43118 10 ton 6 6 Diesel Mobile Office HQ 2 units Kamaz 43118 10 ton 6 6 Diesel 6m Container Truck 10 units Kamaz 43118 10 ton 6 6 Diesel 6m Refridgerator Truck 2 units Kamaz 43118 10 ton 6 6 Diesel Fire Fighting Truck with Water Canon 1 unit Kamaz 65111 25 ton 6 6 Diesel Dump Truck 10 units Terex Class 100 Motor Grader 2 units Terex Class PK-6O Front End Wheel Loader 2 units CAT D-8 Bull Dozer 1 unit 32 Page

Project Iron Fist ET 80-90 Excavator 2 units CAT C864 Vibratory Roller Compactor 2 Kamaz 43118 20 Ton 20,000l Construction Water Bowser Truck 2 units 33 Page

Proiect Iron Fist Annex G: Summary of Communications Equipment Requirement Barrett HF 2050 Base Transceiver Base Station 50 units Barrett HF 2050 Mobile Transceiver, Vehicle Mounted 48 units HF Man?pack Equipment Barrett 2090 HF Tactical Manpack Transceiver Complete 115 units i n. 34 Page

Project Iron Fist Equipment (Intrinsic Safe) Motorola Km, DM4000 Series digital mobile two - I way vehicle mounted radio complete map .m units watt suntan Ioucsaeamr tor Clea! aLl-jlo Rugged from a rear accessory corms-eaters Accessor'. connector supports USE mtertace Large eas,-to-use columeIChannal mos 4 pro-grammasle :ut?tons to Imam-(e ease-abuse and increase operator emcuenc; Ltultr?comurec LEO (Honda clear teeccacr cm radio ocerarmg status 0mm: acts/404159 Group and ?lhcalt PTT IO helps improm communacatrons ef?ctenc, anc eastern Remote Monitor matures hell: ensure ?watches solely and enacle fast assess'hant of remote user status 5 Elegant channel scanning schemes help ensure calls are received first time every time lntellrgent Audio tealure automatrcall, aamsts the radio volume according to the envrronment?s level dome announcement of channel change anc feature actwatron 5 Tone analogue leatwe suppon 821st Enhanced Prwac. Capaotm; LOn-a Won'ar IP ?Srte Connect Srte and Carmen; Plus sue Motorola GP 340 Professional Series portable handheld radios complete 185 units AND B?lif?s Cw, PM 3! Mo Comm hum-mu manual: I I I 4% mu Canon 1" mm Dow A Tu! mumInn-me emym urn MAW Gaol-y 35 Page

Project Iron Fist Motorola DP4400 DP4401 Series portable] handheld radios complete 185 units I U, .W a. .. .6. lanyard i? can.? Huh 2:va gar-41;; . it - A Tram? :re'al-m My .0 ?Pi-39' a: nun? 5:22- !s'nsm-m arzwe' t'an'o? mtg-Jr; - .y a! Radiant??! I VHF Repeater Equipment Motorola DR-3000 Digital VHF Repeater, complete 10 units Failure: ?aw-"J Package (ulnar-ms 'eter'r Inch"): .1 Ont. The DR 3000 repeater is a continuous-duty unit that supports two simultaneous voice or data paths in digital - TDMA mode. It mounts easily in wall or rack systems. This repeater is part of the MOTOTRBO series, delivering increased capacity and spectrum efficiency, integrated data communications and enhanced voice communications through a complete solution. frequency lance: m? a We .M ?emery Channels. 1: (9.9 o. 36 Page

Project iron Fist Annex H: Summary ofSpecial Equipment Requirement Passive Communications Monitoring Equipment ~w~~mw w: Monitoring- and Direction Finding System Compact two?channel monitoring and direction ?nding system (base unit includes waterproof housing with RF module (9 to 3.5 control PC, power supply, heater and communications) Optix, NVE-Optical Night Sight ONS 4V with 2nd Gen+ Ultra GenIlT 80 units Optix, Optical Day Sight ODS 4M 80 units Optix, Optical Day Sight ODS 6M 80 units Optix, Thermal imaging Sight-Identifier R100 20 units rum-um 3Kan 37 Page

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