So what exactly does Hillary Clinton ask for when she gives a paid speech, like the ones she gave at Goldman Sachs? A contract for a speech she gave at the University of Nevada Las Vegas provides some answers.  The contract was obtained by the Las Vegas Review-Journal in August, through the state public records law.

For that speech in October 2014, Clinton requested two payments of $112,500:

The contract reveals that the speeches are tightly controlled, including prior approval of who introduces Clinton and who moderates any question-and-answer session:
The contract also makes clear that the speech itself is the intellectual property of Clinton:

Recording Clinton’s speech is prohibited, but the sponsor must agree to pay $1,250 to a stenographer, who will transcribe the speech for Clinton’s records.

Clinton laughed off a request to release the transcripts of her Goldman Sachs speeches two weeks ago. During the Democratic presidential debate on Thursday she was once again asked about the transcripts and replied that she would “look into” it.

The UNLV contract is not necessarily the same one Clinton uses for all of her speaking arrangements. But, of course, Clinton could release those contracts, too, if she chose to.